John Stewart
Memorial Home

List of Songs

His Albums

Video

Tributes &
Shared Though

My Fantasy
Playlist


John
Stewart is a corner stone in the story of American songwriters and performers. From his work with the Kingston Trio, to The Monkees covering his song “Daydream Believer,” his monumental first solo record “California Bloodlines.” New records and concerts through the 1970’s, and then in 1980 the “Hit” with “Gold” which included Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks backing. This collaboration continued in the 1980’s, then in the 1990’s his record, “Punch The Big Guy,” was songwriting and singing at his very best. He had a number of discs in the 1990’s, and finished with a collaboration with Darwin’s Army.There were limited cassettes available of a “Secret Tapes” series, which fell into obscurity with no commercial release. There are many songwriters who will cite “California Bloodlines” as a watershed moment when hearing for the first time.

My fear is John Stewart will be forgotten. In this corona virus times, PLEASE consider a home version of a John Stewart tune. With any response to this request, I will set up a YouTube channel :John Stewart Memorial. A list of his songs and what other info I have is available at: www.karlfunds.com/JohnStewartMemorial
Though the list may not be complete, there are more than 400 songs which are mostly linked for more information. [List was culled from various sources including AllMusic.com] There is also of suggested lstarting list of artists who might give-a-damn. The man who gave songs like: Daydream Believer, Never Goin’ Back (To Nashville), Runaway Train, July You’re A Woman, and Gold. Plus, hundreds more. Great songs and great writing. Great contributions from so many artists.

NOTE: I have no authorization, nor do I want money. I want music to remember a great guy who had a 40+ year career.

I listened to the Kingston Trio without knowing names of performers, but I knew the songs and words. I moved in my senior year of high school from Buffalo (very-difficult school system) to Wilmington, DE (very easy) in November of 1970. New town, so, I went looking for record stores. I found, The Record Shop, buried in a back corner of a strip mall. By my second time there, the owner asked if I watched the front while everyone else went in the back to smoke. I didn’t smoke then, so sure I’d cover the front. The third time, they didn’t ask. They all just went in the back. I felt very trusted running the cash register without being hired. I also got to play any open records I choose to. And “California Bloodlines” was my choice. That and "Layla, and other love songs” (Derek and the Dominoes). John was a balance to Hard Rock, and he was also a wonderful entertainer.

He would tell stories and make fun of the “folk humor.” Stewart tells the story about The Monkees going to cover his “Daydream Believer” and the producer, Chip Taylor, calls him up, but the corporation won’t let Davey Jones sing the word “Funky” in the second verse. The changed it “happy.’ And John isn’t happy, but three months later the song is number #1 around the world when he called Chip to say “You know, “happy” is working pretty well.”

He is part of my music lexicon.

Please consider contributing your interpretation or homage to Mr. Stewart.  Let his memory live on.

Karl Funds: Kfunds@hotmail.com

Reference:

I'm missing a few which I purchased as downloads.